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Posts Tagged ‘AIAA’

September 2010

Posted by drdave on September 1, 2010

30 September 2010

  • NASA Bill passes the House by 304-118
  • The bubble that separates our sun from the galaxy is surprisingly active, and could leak more cosmic rays. The second global map from the Interstellar Boundary Explorer, or IBEX, shows that the edge of the solar system changes more quickly and drastically than scientists expected.

29 September 2010

  • A team of planet hunters led by astronomers at the University of California, Santa Cruz (UC Santa Cruz), and the Carnegie Institution of Washington, and supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and NASA, has announced the discovery of an Earth-sized planet (three times the mass of Earth) orbiting a nearby star at a distance that places it squarely in the middle of the star’s “habitable zone,” where liquid water could exist on the planet’s surface.
  • Xinhua announced that, “China will launch its second lunar probe, Chang’e II, at an appropriate time from Oct. 1 to 3, the Xichang Satellite Launch Center (XSLC), in southwest China’s Sichuan Province, announced Wednesday. Fueling of the CZ-3C rocket will begin on Sept. 30.”

28 September 2010

  • Aviation Week (and everybody else) is reporting that the House will vote on the Senate version of the NASA Authorization for 2011. House Science Committee Chairman Bart Gordon (D-Tenn.) said in a statement Sept. 27 that, “For the sake of providing certainty, stability and clarity to the NASA workforce and larger space community, I felt it was better to consider a flawed bill than no bill at all as the new fiscal year begins.”
  • Virgin Galactic to launch within 18 months

27 September 2010

  • NASA will host a media teleconference at 1 p.m. EDT, on Wednesday, Sept. 29, to discuss new information about the boundary of our solar system obtained from the agency’s Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) spacecraft. Audio of the teleconference will be streamed live at: http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio
  • China is making final preparations to launch its second lunar probe, possibly as soon as Friday, when the nation marks 61 years of communist rule, state media reported Tuesday. A launch rocket carrying the Chang’e-2, which will go into orbit within 15 kilometres (nine miles) of the moon, has been set up in the southwestern province of Sichuan, the official China Daily reported.

26 September 2010

  • The Air Force launched a Minotaur IV rocket at 9:41 p.m. Sept. 25 from Space Launch Complex-8 at Vandenberg Air Force Base. The Minotaur IV launched the Space-Based Space Surveillance satellite, a first-of-its-kind satellite that can detect and track orbiting space objects from space.
  • Astronauts4Hire’s inaugural mission as a contracted flight researcher will be testing the world’s first beer to be certified for drinking in space. The beer, produced as a joint venture between Saber Astronautics Australia and the 4-Pines Brewing Company (under the name Vostok Pty Ltd), is a recipe designed for easy drinking in both in microgravity and on Earth.

25 September 2010

  • Expedition 24 Commander Alexander Skvortsov and Flight Engineers Tracy Caldwell Dyson and Mikhail Kornienko landed their Soyuz TMA-18 spacecraft in Kazakhstan on Saturday, Sept. 25, wrapping up a six-month stay aboard the International Space Station.

24 September 2010

  • Primordial Magnetic Field May Permeate the Universe
  • The Russian Soyuz TMA-18 spacecraft with three crew members on board undocked on Saturday morning from the International Space Station, a RIA Novosti correspondent reported. The departure of the spacecraft, piloted by Russian cosmonauts Alexander Skvortsov and Mikhail Korniyenko and NASA astronaut Tracy Caldwell-Dyson, was postponed on Friday for 24 hours due to a false alarm signal sent by an airlock sensor.
  • A stunning animation of Saturn’s aurora created from 1,000 images, and the first observations from within the planet’s radio aurora, were presented today at the European Planetary Science Congress.

23 September 2010

  • House Science and Technology Committee Chairman Bart Gordon (D-Tenn.) has drafted a new version of the three-year NASA authorization bill the panel approved in July that recommends substantive changes to the original measure, including more money for commercial space taxis and robotic exploration precursor missions called for in a companion measure approved by the full Senate in August.
  • The Aerojet company announced today that it successfully conducted a static firing of the third nozzle risk reduction motor in support of the Orion jettison motor, a critical component of the launch abort system (LAS) for NASA’s Orion crew exploration vehicle. This successful test firing validates several nozzle design changes implemented to enhance the safety and reliability of the jettison motor.

22 September 2010

  • Methane in the atmosphere of Mars lasts less than a year, according to a study by Italian scientists Sergio Fonti (Universita del Salento) and Giuseppe Marzo (NASA Ames). The question raised is whether the active sources are biological or geological.

21 September 2010

  • Images that NASA’s Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity took at the end of an 81-meter (266-foot) drive on Sept. 16 reveal a dark rock about 31 meters (102 feet) away. The rover’s science team has decided to go get a closer look at the toaster-sized rock and determine whether it is an iron meteorite.
  • In what is highly likely to be her final rollout, Discovery – as the STS-133 stack – departed from the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) Monday evening (7:23pm local time), before making good time for an arrival at Pad 39A, just after 1:15am.
  • The United Launch Alliance (ULA) launched an Atlas V with the classified NROL-41 payload for the United States National Reconnaissance Office.
  • The Martian moon Phobos may have been blasted off its mother planet by a violent impact, or built from fragments of a much larger moon that was destroyed long ago, according to observations from Europe’s Mars Express spacecraft.

20 September 2010

  • The National Space Society continues to call on its members to support the Senate version of the NASA appropriations bill.
  • An Atlas V is scheduled to launch a classified National Reconnaissance Office payload from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California tonight at 8:29 PM Phoenix time (3:29 UTC 21 September).

19 September 2010

  • Throughout the month of September 2010, NASA is undertaking a series of EVA egress/ingress tests on a full-scale mockup of the Orion crew module in the large Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) at the Johnson Space Center.

18 September 2010

17 September 2010

  • A new map of lunar craters by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter is stoking a long-smoldering debate about whether there are two sets of lunar craters: the first from the late heavy bombardment (3.9 billion years ago) – caused by objects that were pushed out of the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter, and the second from more recent craters due to a population of near-Earth asteroids.

16 September 2010

  • The Boeing Company [NYSE: BA] and Space Adventures, Ltd. have established a memorandum of agreement regarding the marketing of anticipated transportation services to destinations in low Earth orbit (LEO) on Boeing commercial crew spacecraft.
  • NASA has announced the awards for the NASA Launch Services (NLS) II Contract. The award will provide a broad range of launch services for NASA’s planetary, Earth-observing, exploration and scientific satellites. NASA selected four companies for awards: Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company of Denver; Orbital Sciences Corporation of Dulles, Va.; Space Exploration Technologies of Hawthorne, Calif.; and United Launch Services, LLC of Littleton, Colo.
  • Eye Candy: The Carina Nebula
  • Impact craters on the surface of the moon tell the tale of a troubled, violent childhood that may have continued into the moon’s adolescence — a history shared, but obliterated, on Earth.

15 September 2010

  • Space Junk is a real threat to human exploration. If it gets bad enough, we would no longer have access to space.
  • Russia has shipped four RD-180 rocket engines to the United States for use on Atlas launch vehicles.

14 September 2010

  • (PhysOrg.com) — Researchers have modeled the likely path taken by Halley’s comet in the 5th century BC and compared their findings to ancient Greek texts from the period. They now suggest the ancient Greeks saw the comet, which would make the sightings over two centuries earlier than previous known observations.

13 September 2010

  • In a paper in the 10 September issue of Science, Paul Niles at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston discusses the implications of carbon and oxygen isotope ratios obtained by the Phoenix Lander for liquid water on the Martian surface in both the past and modern times, along with geologically recent signs of volcanic activity.
  • Two years after saying that the DIRECT project’s Jupiter 130 rocket “defied the laws of physics”, NASA engineers are putting the finishing touches on their nearly identical design: four space shuttle engines underneath the external fuel tank, two four segment solid rocket motors just like the shuttle stack, and the crew and cargo on top. The design made sense in 1992, 2004, 2008 and it still makes sense now.

12 September 2010

  • The Russian Progress M-07M / 39 spacecraft linked up to the aft docking port of the station’s Zvezda service module at 4:58 AM Phoenix time (1158 GMT) above Mongolia.
  • The Spaceport’s Ariane 5 Final Assembly Building has welcomed its fourth heavy-lift launcher of 2010 as preparations move ahead for Arianespace’s dual-satellite mission with the Eutelsat W3B and B-SAT Corporation BSAT-3b payloads on October 28 from French Guiana.

11 September 2010

  • Japan’s H-IIA F18 with the first quasi-zenith satellite “Michibiki” on-board was launched on 11 September at 11:17 UTC (8:17 PM – Japan Standard Time) from the Tanegashima Space Center.
  • ESA has released a Hubble image of a weird, spiral pre-planetary nebula. It is being created by an extreme carbon star, one fortified with so much carbon that there’s a sooty deposit in its photosphere thick enough to block the visible light trying escape from underneath. The star is beginning its death throes, and is shedding its outer layers.

10 September 2010

  • The Russian Progress M-07M was successfully launched on a re-supply mission to the International Space Station, this morning, Friday, 10 September 2010 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 14:22 Moscow time (10:22 UTC – 3:22 Phoenix Time).

9 September 2010

  • A Russian Soyuz-U launch vehicle was scheduled to launch the M-07M/39P Progress resupply ship into orbit on Wednesday morning, but the launch was scrubbed due to high winds. The next attempt will be made Friday.
  • Meanwhile, a Russian Rockot three stage launcher carried a Gonets-M satellite and two Kosmos satellites into orbit. The launch took place at 03:30 UTC on Wednesday.
  • Big Bang Detector heads to space: the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer will study the universe and its origins by searching for dark matter and antimatter and measuring the composition of cosmic rays with greater precision than any previous device.

8 September 2010

  • NASA’s Deep Impact spacecraft beamed down the first image of comet Hartley 2. The image was obtained by the spacecraft’s Medium Resolution Imager on Sept. 5 when the spacecraft was 60 million kilometers (37.2 million miles) away from the comet.
  • Huntsville Alabama is fielding a team to compete for the Lunar X Prize. The goal is to land a rover on the moon, have it travel 500 feet and send pictures and data back to Earth before Dec. 31, 2012. Dynetics Corp. executives announced Tuesday they will lead a seven-organization team.

7 September 2010

  • The Space Review discusses Commercial Crew.
  • VASIMR: hope or hype for Mars exploration?
  • Two small asteroids will pass the Earth this week, within the distance of the Moon. The two objects were discovered on 5 September by Andrea Boattini working with the 1.5 metre reflector at Mount Lemmon in Arizona as part of the Mount Lemmon Survey.

6 September 2010

  • NASA has announced the five experiments that SolarProbePlus will carry when launched in 2018. “The experiments selected for Solar Probe Plus are specifically designed to solve two key questions of solar physics — why is the sun’s outer atmosphere so much hotter than the sun’s visible surface and what propels the solar wind that affects Earth and our solar system? ” said Dick Fisher, director of NASA’s Heliophysics Division in Washington.
  • Recent news about inflatable space habitats, and some history.

5 September 2010

  • Read Lori Garver’s address to the AIAA convention: Space: The Next 50 Years.
  • China launched its eighth satellite of the year and its fourth launch in five weeks. A Long March 3B rocket carrying the Chinasat 6A satellite lifted off from the Xichang space center in southwestern China’s Sichuan province at 1614 GMT (12:14 p.m. EDT) Saturday.

4 September 2010

  • The New Scientist describes the Danish rocket: the smallest crewed spacecraft ever launched, standing room only.
  • The ATHLETE rover, currently under development at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is in the Arizona desert this month to participate in NASA’s Research and Technology Studies, also known as Desert RATS.

3 September 2010

  • The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) announced today that astronaut Chris Hadfield will return to space for a third time and become the first Canadian Commander of the International Space Station (ISS). Hadfield will launch aboard a Russian Soyuz rocket in December 2012, and take command of the station during the second half of a six-month mission.
  • Astrobiology Magazine has a discussion of past, present and future solar sail devices.
  • Tethers on spacecraft may allow maneuvering without fuel.

2 September 2010

  • Russia’s Proton-M rocket blasted off from its Baikonur launching pad at 0:53 GMT Thursday and placed three GLONASS satellites in orbit. Two will join the existing system and the third will be used as an on-orbit backup.

1 September 2010

  • The Herschel infrared space observatory has discovered that ultraviolet starlight is the key ingredient for making water in space.
  • A group of 30 Nobel Laureates, former NASA officials and astronauts and space policy experts have stepped up pressure on U.S. House lawmakers to support key elements of the Obama administration’s space policy. An eight-page letter delivered Tuesday to House Science Committee chairman Bart Gordon and other leaders says the House’s NASA plans “substantially” underfund technology development, commercial spaceflight, student research and robotic exploration precursors, among other priorities.

Posted in Asteroid, Canadian Space Agency, Comet, Earth, European Space Agency, International Space Station, JAXA, Mars, NASA, Russian Space Agency, Space Shuttle | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

October 2009

Posted by drdave on August 4, 2010

31 October 2009

  • Headlines in the space news world will talk about Masten coming from behind with only minutes to spare to beat Armadillo. See the details. Also here for Jonathon Goff’s comments.
  • LROC continues with spectacular views of the Moon. Frozen Impact Melt on the far side of the Moon.
  • A NASA press release announced the upcoming transfer of the Tranquility pressurized module from the the European Space Agency to NASA. Tranquility will provide room for many of the station’s life support systems. Attached to the node is a cupola, a unique work station with windows on its six sides and top. The module will be delivered to the station during space shuttle Endeavour’s STS-130 mission, targeted for launch Feb. 4, 2010.

30 October 2009

  • The JAXA HTV-1 resupply spacecraft is set to depart the ISS with the latest garbage dump and burn up in the atmosphere.
  • NASA is working to recover the Ares I-X first stage. One of the three parachutes collapsed, and the lower segment of the rocket buckled, possibly on impact with the ocean.
  • BOOM. Two teams report in Nature on a gamma-ray burst that occurred a mere 630 million years after the Big Bang (that’s 13.1 billion years ago). It is the youngest gamma-ray burst ever seen. The previous youngest burst happened 825 million years after the Big Bang.

29 October 2009

  • LROC unveils Apollo 17 landing site. Great resolution.
  • The most distant object in the universe.
  • Give credit where credit is due. NASA launched its first new rocket in thirty years. Successfully. Lots to be learned from the data. Cheers.
  • “Ruh Roh”. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is still in “Safe” mode after six weeks. Engineers are now working to create a safeguard against that worst-case scenario as well as finding the cause of the mysterious voltage signals.

28 October 2009

  • The scrubbed launch of Ares I-X is now scheduled for launch on Wednesday. There is a four-hour launch window, extending from 8 a.m. until 12 noon EDT. See NASA TV.
  • The number of close encounters between objects in orbit will rise 50 per cent in the next decade, and quadruple by 2059. Countermeasures will add greatly to the cost of future missions.
  • Good news for America’s Space Exploration program. “Representatives from most of the 27 member governments of the European Union (EU) on Oct. 23 expressed support for a major, if still undefined, financial investment in space exploration alongside the European Space Agency (ESA) but conceded it will take a year before they are ready to set firm budget and policy goals. Meeting here as part of the EU-ESA International Conference on Human Space Exploration, they said that by late 2010 they should be able to make initial decisions on a space exploration roadmap that includes robotic and manned missions in collaboration with the United States, Russia, Japan and other nations including China and India. They also acknowledged that the United States, which they view as the natural coordinator of a major exploration initiative, will need the next 12 months to align U.S. space exploration objectives with NASA’s likely budget.”

27 October 2009

  • Following the announcement of a hole on the Moon into a sub-lunar lava tube (see below 23 October), comes the announcement of a similar find on Mars. Glen Cushing, a physicist with the US Geological Survey, discovered the series of “collapse depressions” in extinct lava flows from a Martian volcano.
  • NASA publishes a list of upcoming launches.
  • In a case of being in the right place at the right time, the MESSENGER spacecraft was able to capture an average-sized solar flare, allowing astronomers to study high-energy solar neutrons at less than 1 astronomical unit (AU) from the sun for the first time.

26 October 2009

  • The Ares I-X is scheduled for launch on Tuesday. There is a four-hour launch window, extending from 8 a.m. until 12 noon EDT. If weather scrubs Tuesday’s attempt, the launch team will try again on Wednesday, maintaining the same launch window.
  • Jeff Foust has a discussion about political and other perspectives of the Augustine Commission Report on The Space Review.

25 October 2009

  • The Orlando Sentinel has an interview with Jeff Greason from the Augustine Commission: “It’s time to base U.S. space policy on the “truth”
  • “A plethora of boulders surrounds braided flows of impact melt along the inside wall of crater Epigenes A.” Latest LROC image.
  • Neat images on Astronaut Nicole Stott’s Blog.

24 October 2009

  • Follow NASA on your iPhone with the NASA App. The App delivers up-to-the-minute NASA content directly from Agency sources in one easy-to-use mobile platform.
  • Interested in the missions to Mars over the past 50 years? Check out this poster.
  • Two ESA satellites are set for launch on 2 November 2009 from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome in northern Russia. SMOS will provide the data to produce global maps of soil moisture at least every three days and global maps of sea-surface salinity averaged over 30 days. Proba-2 incorporates a total of 17 technology developments and four scientific experiments that focus on solar and space weather.

23 October 2009

  • A deep hole on the Moon that could open into a vast underground tunnel has been found for the first time.
  • NASA has begun to shift focus toward longer range research in technology.
  • JPL has completed operational testing of procedures to extract Spirit from the soft sand it became trapped in five months ago. “Current plans call for an independent panel to review Spirit driving plans in late October, following analysis of results from the readiness test. Unless that review recommends any further preparations, Spirit will probably begin extraction moves within two weeks after the review.”

22 October 2009

21 October 2009

  • The New Scientist rates the five options of the Augustine Commission.
  • The Russians are preparing to launch the Mini-Research Module 2, or MRM 2, aboard a Soyuz rocket on Nov. 10 at 1422 GMT (9:22 a.m. EST) for attachment to the International Space Station

20 October 2009

  • NASA rolled out the Ares I-X rocket to the launch pad early this morning.
  • Ames Research Center has announced the winners of the Regolith Excavation Challenge, held on Oct. 17-18, 2009. Competitors were required to use mobile, robotic digging machines capable of excavating at least 330 pounds of simulated moon dirt, known as regolith, and depositing it into a container in 30 minutes or less. The winning excavator lifted 1,103 pounds within the allotted time.
  • The Orionid Meteor Shower will be in full swing tonight. Observers in the Northern Hemisphere will see around 20 meteors per hour at maximum, while observers in the Southern Hemisphere will see around 40 meteors per hour. Best viewing is thought to be around 3:00 AM Phoenix time.

19 October 2009

  • The Augustine Commission is expected to release its final report on Wednesday, 21 October 2009.
  • On Monday, Oct. 19 at 3pm PDT, Mr. David Thompson will join Conrad Foundation’s The Exchange webinar to discuss his thoughts on what innovation means for the Aerospace Industry, and the AIAA winners of Aerospace Exploration and Space Nutrition challenge categories. Registration is open to the public.
  • NASA postponed the roll-out of the ARES I-X from this morning to tomorrow morning. Live NASA Television coverage with commentary will start at 11:45 p.m., Oct. 19
  • It is expected that approval of the Range Safety waiver for the Flight Termination System on the Ares I-X rocket will be granted.

18 October 2009

17 October 2009

  • NASA announced that the shepherding spacecraft did capture the plume from the impact of the Centaur rocket. “With the spacecraft returning data until virtually the last second, the thermal and near-infrared cameras returned excellent images of the Centaur impact crater at a resolution of less than 6.5 feet (2 m). The images indicate that the crater was about 92 feet (28 m) wide.”
  • Sometimes progress is fast, but the results are slow coming to light. Hubble observations taken Dec. 9 and 10, 2005, showed Xena’s diameter as 1,490 miles (with an uncertainty of 60 miles), while Pluto has a diameter of 1442 miles. That makes the “tenth” planet the ninth largest.
  • NASA has released this Cassini image of Janus, one of the moons of Saturn.

16 October 2009

  • NASA has released the first all sky map from its Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) spacecraft, showing the solar System’s interaction with the Milky Way’s interstellar medium.
  • The 2009 Regolith Excavation Challenge Oct. 17-18, with a $750,000 prize, will pit 23 teams using robots they designed and built to excavate simulated lunar soil. To qualify, a robot must dig up at least 330 pounds of regolith and deposit it into a container in 30 minutes.
  • ESA astronaut Frank De Winne took over the command of the International Space Station – the first non-American and non-Russian to take on this role.
  • In an Op-Ed article in the Wall Street Journal, thirteen former astronauts urged NASA to let commercial space firms handle crew to low Earth orbit. They quote Sally Ride, from the Augustine Commission, “We would like to be able to get NASA out of the business of getting people to low Earth orbit.”

15 October 2009

  • Spectacular fireball over the Netherlands.
  • The Planetary Society has the latest Mars rover updates for Spirit and Opportunity.
  • European Space Agency (ESA) reports that an Engineering Test Unit (ETU), a test model of ESA’s Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) for the James Webb Space Telescope has been completed and will be shipped to NASA.
  • Robert Bigelow’s open letter to NASA Administrator Charles Bolden about commercial cargo and crew launch.

14 October 2009

  • NASA has announced an update to the IBEX Mission (Interstellar Boundary Explorer). A briefing will be held Thursday, 15 October 2009
  • From the Orlando Sentinel: “People are very worried [our] efforts are a threat to Constellation rather than an enabler,” says Ken Bowersox, a former astronaut hired by Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX). “We don’t want to compete like that. We want to enable. We want to provide a cheap way to get to station so you can spend money to do the exciting exploration things”. Liberate the NASA exploration program from mundane tasks.
  • Bunk: Apolinario Chile Pixtun, a Mayan Indian elder, is tired of being bombarded with frantic questions about the Mayan calendar supposedly “running out” on Dec. 21, 2012. “I came back from England last year and, man, they had me fed up with this stuff.”

13 October 2009

12 October 2009

  • National Geographic “Map of the Day” – 50 Years of Solar System Missions.
  • The Hubble Space Telescope was focused on the Moon Friday morning when the LCROSS Centaur stage and the shepherding spacecraft impacted the Moon. There was no immediate indication of the impact and additional processing is expected.
  • The 60th International Astronomical Congress will be held this week in Korea. NASA Administrator Gen. Charles Bolden will attend, although he has expressed his trepidation about being abroad when the Augustine Commission releases its final report.
  • Rockets and Such – we are back wandering in the desert

11 October 2009

  • Read Eric Berger’s interview with Neil deGrasse Tyson. Tyson says “The question is: What’s the value of visible projects by NASA in the overall portfolio to the hearts and minds of Americans? I think we have to do it, otherwise we should just close up shop and watch the rest of the world lead us into the future.”
  • A Russian cosmonaut, an American astronaut and the world’s first space clown departed the International Space Station and returned to Earth, winding up their expeditions to the orbiting outpost.
  • ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Frank De Winne has become the first European commander of the International Space Station this weekend. The current commander Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka has left the ISS on board Soyuz TMA-16.
  • Mars rover Spirit is in day 2049 of it 90 day mission and Opportunity is in day 2028 of its 90 day mission. Both are well outside their warranty date. Spirit has traveled 7,729.93 meters, and Opportunity has traveled an incredible 17,962.44 meters.

10 October 2009

  • ESA (European Space Agency) Director-General Jean-Jacques Dordain told the 18-nation agency’s ruling council he expects to finalize an agreement with NASA by mid-November for a 2016 launch of a 600-kilogram ESA lander that will include exobiology experiments, and a 2018 mission. NASA will supply two Atlas V rockets and will feature ESA’s rover deployed to the Mars surface by the same Sky Crane system — with the rover, attached by chord to the descent module, gently lowered to the surface — that NASA plans to use for its large Mars Science Laboratory rover to be launched in 2011.
  • The LRO Diviner instrument obtained infrared observations of the LCROSS impact this morning. LRO flew by the LCROSS Centaur impact site 90 seconds after impact at a distance of ~80 km.
  • Space Daily that the ocean on Jupiter’s moon Europa contains enough oxygen to support life.

9 October 2009

  • Prepare for the LCROSS impact on the Moon. Live NASA web coverage at 6:30 AM EDT, Friday (Yes, that’s 3:30 AM Phoenix time). Impact is at 4:31 AM Phoenix time.
  • NASA Administrator Charles Bolden: “We should not fool ourselves. We should not pretend that if we decide we’re going to take a break from human spaceflight that nobody’s going to do that. That’s not going to happen … China, Russia — they’re the natural leaders and they will ascend to leadership.”
  • The New Scientist reports that while Apophis is less likely to impact the Earth in 2036, 2068 is looming as a threat.

8 October 2009

  • The Augustine Commission holds its final public session via phone conference call at 10:00 AM Phoenix time. A link to the streaming audio may be found half way down on this page. Toll-free number: 1-888-373-5705 Participant Passcode: 190078
  • NASA has released the refined orbit of the asteroid APOPHIS. The risk of its hitting Earth in 2036 has been reduced dropped from one-in-45,000 to about one-in-250,000.
  • Masten Space Systems completed their Level 1 flight in the Lunar Lander Challenge and are awaiting a final ruling by the judges. All looks good.

7 October 2009

  • NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope has found a GIANT ring around Saturn. GIANT.
  • ITAR reform is needed to expand U.S. exports and competitiveness.
  • Boeing and Energia have announced plans to build a future common docking system.

6 October 2009

  • Dr. Steve Squyres (Cornell University) has been awarded the Carl Sagan Medal by the American Astronomical Society for his work explaining the Mars Exploration Rover mission to millions of people.
  • SpaceX has announced completion of acceptance testing of both the Falcon 9 first and second stages in preparation for the first flight of Falcon 9.
  • Opportunity, one of two Mars rovers and now in its fifth year of a 90 day mission, has discovered another meteorite on the Martian surface.

5 October 2009

  • World Space Week. “The theme this year is Space for Education. Teachers can inspire students by using the excitement of space. It’s a powerful tool to fuel their motivation to learn.”
  • Dr. David Livingston’s The Space Show – “The Monday, Oct. 5, 2009, 11 AM-12:30 PM PDT Program is the special AIAA/Space Show Augustine Commission panel discussion featuring Bob Dickman, “Doc” Horowitz, Frank Culbertson, John Klineberg, Elliot Pulham, and Harrison Schmitt.” Listen Live.
  • Humor – “Seti Fails

4 October 2009

  • Today is the 50th anniversary of the launch of Luna 3, the first to photograph the lunar farside. Details of Luna 3 are here.
  • The Star Wars in Concert has performances at 2 PM and 7 PM today, Sunday.
  • NASA has released the latest images from the Herschel Infrared space telescope. One of the images “reveals a cold and turbulent region where material is just beginning to condense into new stars. It is located in the plane of our Milky Way galaxy, 60 degrees from the center. Blue shows warmer material, red the coolest, while green represents intermediate temperatures. The red filaments are made up of the coldest material pictured here — material that is slightly warmer than the coldest temperature theoretically attainable in the universe”. Check in with Phil Plait and his observations at Bad Astronomy.
  • The European Space Agency (ESA) continues work on the Advanced Re-entry Vehicle. The vehicle is large enough to eventually give ESA access to the International Space Station for a crew of four.

3 October 2009

2 October 2009

  • The Soyuz spacecraft docked with the International Space Station at 1:35 AM Phoenix time today, Friday, after executing a rendezvous burn Thursday. Image of the combined members of expedition 20 and 21.
  • Jeff Greason, reflecting on his experience with the Augustine commission, said that with NASA overhead at $6-7 billion a year, “The bottom line is that they can’t afford to keep the doors open with they money they’ve got, let alone do anything with it.”
  • A German team – c-base Open Moon Team – has entered the Google Lunar X PRIZE.
  • The latest rumor about the release of the Augustine Commission final report comes from the Huntsville Times.

1 October 2009

  • The fifth Ariane 5 of the year is poised to launch between 14:59 and 16:10 Phoenix time today, Thursday. Watch live launch coverage.
  • Discover.com reports on a minor power glitch suffered by the Messanger spacecraft while making its third pass by Mercury prior to settling into orbit in 2011. glitch
  • Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s (DARPA) is working on a concept that replaces large satellites with clusters of wirelessly-linked modular spacecraft flying in loose formation has the potential to drive cultural change, Aviation Week reports.
  • NASA has released a study of the Scientific work done at the International Space Station during its first eight years.
  • Soyuz TMA-16, launched yesterday, is scheduled to reach the International Space Station tomorrow, Friday, 2 October 2009.

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