NSS Phoenix Space News

Posts Tagged ‘Dark Matter’

June 2011

Posted by drdave on June 3, 2011

30 June

  • NASA’s plan to use commercial spaceships to carry astronauts to orbit after the space shuttles retire is coming along nicely, the agency announced today. The four private companies awarded funding under NASA’s most recent round of Commercial Crew Development 2 (CCDev2) contracts have met all of their initial milestones so far, agency representatives said.

29 June

  • A Minotaur rocket launched a small military satellite late Wednesday evening from Virginia. The Minotaur 1 rocket lifted off from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at Wallops Island, Virginia, at 11:09 pm EDT (0309 GMT Thursday) and released the ORS-1 satellite into low Earth orbit about 12 minutes later.

28 June

27 June

  • Space Security Policy: The US and EU recently released documents regarding space security. Should they come to an accord or should the US take the lead?
  • Continuing Light Squared Issues: John Byrne heads the wireless and mobile infrastructure research group at IDC. He said the interference issue may continue to be a sticking point for LightSquared, even with the proposed solution. “At this point I think you have to assume that the deployment is on hold until those concerns are addressed to the satisfaction of the FCC and all of the congressmen and senators that are on the FCC on this issue,” he said.

26 June

  • As military-launch costs soar, would-be competitors protest. Increase will be nearly 50 percent during the next four years.
  • The White Sands Space Harbor, the landing site for the STS-3 in 1982, will be closing its doors after 35 years due to the end of the space shuttle program; the last launch is scheduled to take place in July.
  • Following its replacement on Atlantis’ SSME-3 (Space Shuttle Main Engine), the new Main Fuel Valve (MFV) is undergoing a weekend of testing at Pad 39A, aimed at providing confidence the hardware will perform as required during the launch countdown. Meanwhile, inspections on ET-138′s stringers have been completed with no obvious issues reported.

25 June

  • If skies are clear and all goes well Tuesday evening, observers throughout Maryland and much of the Mid-Atlantic region should be able to watch a big rocket launch from Virginia’s Wallops Island. The Air Force will attempt to launch a battlefield imaging satellite into orbit from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport. The ORS-1 satellite will ride atop a four-stage, solid-fuel Minotaur 1 rocket, the largest ever launched from the Delmarva peninsula.
  • Asteroid 2011 MD will pass approximately 12,000 kilometers above the Earth’s surface at about 9:30 am EDT (1330 GMT) Monday, JPL reported Friday.

24 June

  • NASA’s next Mars spacecraft arrived at Cape Canaveral this week in preparation for its launch later this year. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), also known as Curiosity, arrived at the Kennedy Space Center on Thursday on board a C-17 cargo aircraft, which flew the spacecraft from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. MSL, the most advanced Mars rover built, is scheduled for launch late this year from Cape Canaveral on an Atlas 5 rocket.

23 June

  • Betelgeuse, a red supergiant in the constellation of Orion, is one of the brightest stars in the night sky. It is also one of the biggest, being almost the size of the orbit of Jupiter — about four and half times the diameter of the Earth’s orbit. The VLT image shows the surrounding nebula, which is much bigger than the supergiant itself, stretching 60 billion kilometres away from the star’s surface — about 400 times the distance of the Earth from the Sun.

22 June

  • Mark Kelly, the NASA astronaut who commanded the most recent shuttle mission and is married to congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, announced on Tuesday his plans to retire. Kelly announced via social media that he would retire from both NASA and the US Navy on October 1.
  • The “Deep Space Adventure” movie, lands July 8 at the Adler Planetarium, guiding earthbound visitors through an outer space journey that planetarium officials think is second only to actual space travel. 20 individual digital projectors for a screen resolution of more than 8,000-by-8,000 pixels will be replacing the 40-year-old Zeiss projector — made famous during a 2008 presidential debate when John McCain ripped a possible replacement as a “$3 million overhead projector”.

21 June

  • Russia successfully launched their Progress M-11M resupply mission to the International Space Station at 7:38 AM Phoenix time (1438 UTC).
  • Speaking at the 49th Paris Air Show in France, Vladimir Popovkin said that the Russian Space Agency (Roscosmos) will not produce a spaceship for tourists. Citing a full schedule of manned Soyuz and Progress re-supply missions to support the International Space Station as the reason for not proceeding at the moment, Popovkin did not rule out business in the future.

20 June

  • China is preparing to launch the ZX-10 ZhongXing-10 – also designated ChinaSat-10, Sinosat-5 or Xinnuo-5 – domestic communications satellite on Monday (16:05-16:30 UTC) from the Xi Chang Satellite Launch Center, in Sichuan Province.
  • Raffaello, more formally as the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, is stuffed with a full year’s worth of necessities for the International Space Station. It will be loaded into shuttle Atlantis’ payload bay Monday to prepare for launch next month.

19 June

18 June

  • NASA’s space probe Dawn is continuing its approach towards Vesta. The camera system on board is beginning to show the giant asteroid in more and more detail. The newest pictures taken on June 1st and processed by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) in Germany already hint at the huge crater on Vesta’s southern hemisphere that is known from earlier observations. In addition, the new images show a dark feature close to the asteroid’s equator.

17 June

  • A faulty engine valve on the space shuttle Atlantis found earlier this week can be replaced without causing a delay in the planned final shuttle launch.
  • A newly discovered comet from the farthest reaches of the solar system could become a sky spectacle in 2013. Right now the comet is 700 million miles (1.2 billion kilometers) from the sun, well beyond the orbit of Jupiter.

16 June

  • After nearly three months in orbit about Mercury, MESSENGER’s payload is providing a wealth of new information about the planet closest to the Sun, as well as a few surprises.
  • Comet Hartley 2’s hyperactive state, as studied by NASA’s EPOXI mission, is detailed in a new paper published in this week’s issue of the journal Science. “Hartley 2 is a hyperactive little comet, spewing out more water than most other comets its size,” said Mike A’Hearn, principal investigator of EPOXI from the University of Maryland, College Park. “When warmed by the sun, dry ice — frozen carbon dioxide — deep in the comet’s body turns to gas jetting off the comet and dragging water ice with it.”

15 June

  • The Sun may be entering an extended period of relatively quiet activity, a development that has implications for space exploration and possibly the Earth’s climate. Scientists said at a meeting Tuesday of the American Astronomical Society’s Solar Physics Division in New Mexico that evidence was mounting that the Sun’s activity would diminish, perhaps for an extended period. Solar scientists have not detected a zonal flow associated with the onset of a new cycle of solar activity, and others found a long-term weakening trend in sunspots.
  • NASA’s Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or Stereo, has discovered 122 previously unknown sets of twin stars.
  • Lockheed Martin plans to lay off 1,200 workers in its Space Systems division by the end of the year, with sites in Denver, Sunnyvale, Calif., and Pennsylvania’s Delaware Valley region to be hardest hit. The layoffs amount to 7.5% of the 16,000-strong Space Systems workforce.

14 June

  • Orbital Sciences Corporation will build the latest spacecraft for a Thai company, and SpaceX will launch that satellite, in separate deals announced Monday. Orbital won a contract to build the Thaicom 6 satellite, based on the GEOStar bus. The satellite will carry a mix of C- and Ku-band transponders, with 3.7 kilowatts of power and a launch mass of 3,200 kilograms. That satellite will be launched by SpaceX on a Falcon 9 rocket in the second quarter of 2013.
  • Test results compiled by the National Executive Committee for Space-Based Positioning, Navigation and Timing indicate the 4G network under development from LightSquared interferes with GPS signals, darkening the network’s prospects.
  • The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)’s Hayabusa space probe has been officially recognized by Guinness World Records, adding yet another feather to the project’s cap after the accolades that have poured in from the scientific community over the past year. Recognition by Guinness World Records “will help spread knowledge of the Hayabusa probe’s achievements among the Japanese people, so I’m very happy,” said JAXA’s Hayabusa project manager Junichiro Kawaguchi.

13 June

  • Post flight processing continues on the Endeavour space shuttle.
  • NASA’s Dawn mission to the doughnut-shaped asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter, which launched in September 2007, is now approaching Vesta, a protoplanet that is currently some 143 million miles from Earth.

12 June

  • Three years before its arrival the camera system on board the space probe Rosetta renders the first images of its destination. Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko is the 2014 target.
  • The European Space Agency should formally approve this summer the construction of an Italian-led demonstrator that will launch into space on a rocket, fly back to Earth like an airplane and parachute into the Pacific Ocean. The Intermediate Experimental Vehicle is on track to blast off on a Vega rocket in late 2013, speed around the Earth at a peak altitude of nearly 300 miles, then drop from space and fly back to Earth with the help of aerodynamic flaps and a parachute.
  • Today, Russia’s Mission Control will raise the orbit of the International Space Station (ISS) by 20 km (12.4 miles) using Europe’s ATV-2 Johannes Kepler to 365 km (226.8 miles).

11 June

10 June

  • A United Launch Alliance Delta II successfully launched the Aquarius / SAC-D ocean monitoring satellite this morning. Liftoff was at 7:20 AM Phoenix time (1420 UTC).
  • The Soyuz TMA-02M spacecraft carrying three new ISS crew members docked with the station Thursday afternoon. The Soyuz TMA-02M spacecraft docked with the Rassvet module of the station at 2:18 PM Phoenix time (2118 UTC) Thursday.
  • The new American commercial cargo spacecraft Dragon will be sent to the ISS at the end of this year, NASA Associate Administrator for Space Operations William Gerstenmaier told a press conference at the Mission Control Centre here on Friday.

9 June

  • On Wednesday, officials called off plans for today’s launch attempt of Aquarius/SAC-D mission. Engineers checking data spotted a problem with the pre-loaded computer flight profile that helps the steer the rocket through upper-level winds.
  • A report by NASA’s inspector general warned that the agency’s latest Mars rover mission may require additional funding in order to be ready for launch later this year. The report, by NASA’s Office of the Inspector General, found that the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission underestimated its costs by $44 million, and without additional funding the mission could miss its launch window late this year, forcing a two-year delay. MSL, also known as Curiosity, already missed its original launch window in 2009 in order because of development delays.

8 June

7 June

  • Russia successfully launched their Soyuz TMA-02M spacecraft on a mission to the International Space Station. Docking is scheduled for 2:22 PM Phoenix time Thursday, 9 June (2122 UTC).
  • A NASA instrument will hitchhike aboard an Argentine satellite when it rides an American rocket to space from Vandenberg Air Force Base early Thursday morning. The United Launch Alliance Delta 2 rocket and the Aquarius/SAC-D satellite are set to lift off from Space Launch Complex-2 between 7:20 and 7:25 a.m. Thursday.

6 June

  • A decision on the configuration of the Space Launch System (SLS) Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLV) is just weeks away, as final evaluations take place into a “staged evolution of a single heavy launcher”, after NASA’s leadership rejected the two-phase approach, which would have resulted in an open competition for the Beyond Earth Orbit (BEO) derivative of the SLS.
  • A paper published in the current issue of Nature provides the first cohesive explanation of how the migration of Jupiter shaped the asteroid belt and stripped a lot of material from the region, essentially starving Mars of formation materials.

5 June

  • Assemblage of the Russian Soyuz-FG rocket to carry Soyuz TMA-02M manned spacecraft to the International Space Station was completed on Saturday. The mission to the International Space Station is set for June 8. Soyuz TMA-02M will bring new Expedition 28 astronauts to the ISS. The docking is slated for June 10.

4 June

  • A pair of Danish amateur rocket makers successfully launched their 30 foot tall, 1.6 ton liquid fueled rocket out over the Baltic Sea.
  • A team of scientists at the University of Arizona’s Luna and Planetary Sciences Laboratory has been picked NASA to head up an $800 million space exploration project named OSIRIS-REx. The plan is for NASA to launch the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft in 2016 for the 575-meter near-Earth asteroid 1999 RQ36. The spacecraft would then orbit and explore the asteroid for more than a year before closing in and collecting samples which would then be returned to Earth sometime in 2023.
  • The Boeing Company said Friday it had issued 60-day layoff notices to approximately 510 employees in its Space Exploration division as a result of the end of the Space Shuttle program. The notices include an estimated 260 employees in Houston, 150 at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., and 100 at the company’s Huntington Beach, California, facility.
  • A group of Canadians who spent their weekends hanging around garages has won the first edition of a NASA robotics competition ever to be opened to international competition. During the competition, the teams remotely controlled excavators — called “Lunabots” — to determine which could collect the most simulated lunar soil over 15 minutes. Laurentian’s team had the best result, digging up just over 237 kilograms of simulated moon rock. The second-place team from the University of North Dakota scooped up over 172 kilograms.

3 June

  • The space shuttle Atlantis arrived at the launch pad early Wednesday as preparations for the final mission of the space shuttle era continue. Atlantis arrived at launch pad 39A at 12:29 AM Phoenix time (0729 GMT) Wednesday, just under seven hours after leaving the Vehicle Assembly Building and less than an hour after the shuttle Endeavour landed at the Shuttle Landing Facility several miles away. Atlantis is scheduled for launch on STS-135, the final shuttle mission, on 8 July 2011.
  • Atlantis (STS-135) was soaked by thunderstorms and is undergoing checks following lightning storm

2 June

  • A drive of 482 feet (146.8 meters) on June 1, 2011, took NASA’s Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity past 30 kilometers (18.64 miles) in total odometry during 88 months of driving on Mars. That’s 50 times the distance originally planned for the mission and more than 12 times the distance racehorses will run next week at the Belmont Stakes.
  • In two separate reports, astronomers reveal ancient globular clusters to be breeding much younger blue-straggler members, and a relatively young open cluster hosting an aging stellar population, calling into question theories of stellar evolution.
  • The Intelsat 18 telecommunications satellite will be launched by Sea launch Co. from the Russian-run Baikonur Cosmodrome in September or October following Sea Launch’s agreement to donate rocket hardware previously intended for a future Intelsat launch campaign
  • An asteroid the size of a small motorhome zoomed near Earth last night (June 1), coming closer to us than the moon ever does. The 23-foot-long (7-meter) space rock, named 2009 BD, came within 215,000 miles (346,000 kilometers) of Earth
  • Four astronomers who helped befuddle the world by discovering evidence for dark matter have won a prestigious cosmology prize. Scientists infer the existence of dark matter by its gravitational influence on the regular, visible matter around it. The scientists will share the $500,000 purse that comes with the 2011 Cosmology Prize of the Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation.

1 June

  • The space shuttle Endeavour landed at the Kennedy Space Center early Wednesday, completing its final mission and the next-to-last flight of the shuttle program overall. Endeavour landed at the Shuttle Landing Facility at KSC at 11:34 PM Phoenix time Tuesday (0634 UTC Wednesday) on the first available landing opportunity, ending a nearly 16-day mission to the International Space Station.
Advertisements

Posted in Asteroid, Comet, Commercial Space, Earth, European Space Agency, International Space Station, Mars, Milky Way, NASA, Roscosmos, Russian Space Agency, Solar System, Soyuz, Sun | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

September 2010

Posted by drdave on September 1, 2010

30 September 2010

  • NASA Bill passes the House by 304-118
  • The bubble that separates our sun from the galaxy is surprisingly active, and could leak more cosmic rays. The second global map from the Interstellar Boundary Explorer, or IBEX, shows that the edge of the solar system changes more quickly and drastically than scientists expected.

29 September 2010

  • A team of planet hunters led by astronomers at the University of California, Santa Cruz (UC Santa Cruz), and the Carnegie Institution of Washington, and supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and NASA, has announced the discovery of an Earth-sized planet (three times the mass of Earth) orbiting a nearby star at a distance that places it squarely in the middle of the star’s “habitable zone,” where liquid water could exist on the planet’s surface.
  • Xinhua announced that, “China will launch its second lunar probe, Chang’e II, at an appropriate time from Oct. 1 to 3, the Xichang Satellite Launch Center (XSLC), in southwest China’s Sichuan Province, announced Wednesday. Fueling of the CZ-3C rocket will begin on Sept. 30.”

28 September 2010

  • Aviation Week (and everybody else) is reporting that the House will vote on the Senate version of the NASA Authorization for 2011. House Science Committee Chairman Bart Gordon (D-Tenn.) said in a statement Sept. 27 that, “For the sake of providing certainty, stability and clarity to the NASA workforce and larger space community, I felt it was better to consider a flawed bill than no bill at all as the new fiscal year begins.”
  • Virgin Galactic to launch within 18 months

27 September 2010

  • NASA will host a media teleconference at 1 p.m. EDT, on Wednesday, Sept. 29, to discuss new information about the boundary of our solar system obtained from the agency’s Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) spacecraft. Audio of the teleconference will be streamed live at: http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio
  • China is making final preparations to launch its second lunar probe, possibly as soon as Friday, when the nation marks 61 years of communist rule, state media reported Tuesday. A launch rocket carrying the Chang’e-2, which will go into orbit within 15 kilometres (nine miles) of the moon, has been set up in the southwestern province of Sichuan, the official China Daily reported.

26 September 2010

  • The Air Force launched a Minotaur IV rocket at 9:41 p.m. Sept. 25 from Space Launch Complex-8 at Vandenberg Air Force Base. The Minotaur IV launched the Space-Based Space Surveillance satellite, a first-of-its-kind satellite that can detect and track orbiting space objects from space.
  • Astronauts4Hire’s inaugural mission as a contracted flight researcher will be testing the world’s first beer to be certified for drinking in space. The beer, produced as a joint venture between Saber Astronautics Australia and the 4-Pines Brewing Company (under the name Vostok Pty Ltd), is a recipe designed for easy drinking in both in microgravity and on Earth.

25 September 2010

  • Expedition 24 Commander Alexander Skvortsov and Flight Engineers Tracy Caldwell Dyson and Mikhail Kornienko landed their Soyuz TMA-18 spacecraft in Kazakhstan on Saturday, Sept. 25, wrapping up a six-month stay aboard the International Space Station.

24 September 2010

  • Primordial Magnetic Field May Permeate the Universe
  • The Russian Soyuz TMA-18 spacecraft with three crew members on board undocked on Saturday morning from the International Space Station, a RIA Novosti correspondent reported. The departure of the spacecraft, piloted by Russian cosmonauts Alexander Skvortsov and Mikhail Korniyenko and NASA astronaut Tracy Caldwell-Dyson, was postponed on Friday for 24 hours due to a false alarm signal sent by an airlock sensor.
  • A stunning animation of Saturn’s aurora created from 1,000 images, and the first observations from within the planet’s radio aurora, were presented today at the European Planetary Science Congress.

23 September 2010

  • House Science and Technology Committee Chairman Bart Gordon (D-Tenn.) has drafted a new version of the three-year NASA authorization bill the panel approved in July that recommends substantive changes to the original measure, including more money for commercial space taxis and robotic exploration precursor missions called for in a companion measure approved by the full Senate in August.
  • The Aerojet company announced today that it successfully conducted a static firing of the third nozzle risk reduction motor in support of the Orion jettison motor, a critical component of the launch abort system (LAS) for NASA’s Orion crew exploration vehicle. This successful test firing validates several nozzle design changes implemented to enhance the safety and reliability of the jettison motor.

22 September 2010

  • Methane in the atmosphere of Mars lasts less than a year, according to a study by Italian scientists Sergio Fonti (Universita del Salento) and Giuseppe Marzo (NASA Ames). The question raised is whether the active sources are biological or geological.

21 September 2010

  • Images that NASA’s Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity took at the end of an 81-meter (266-foot) drive on Sept. 16 reveal a dark rock about 31 meters (102 feet) away. The rover’s science team has decided to go get a closer look at the toaster-sized rock and determine whether it is an iron meteorite.
  • In what is highly likely to be her final rollout, Discovery – as the STS-133 stack – departed from the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) Monday evening (7:23pm local time), before making good time for an arrival at Pad 39A, just after 1:15am.
  • The United Launch Alliance (ULA) launched an Atlas V with the classified NROL-41 payload for the United States National Reconnaissance Office.
  • The Martian moon Phobos may have been blasted off its mother planet by a violent impact, or built from fragments of a much larger moon that was destroyed long ago, according to observations from Europe’s Mars Express spacecraft.

20 September 2010

  • The National Space Society continues to call on its members to support the Senate version of the NASA appropriations bill.
  • An Atlas V is scheduled to launch a classified National Reconnaissance Office payload from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California tonight at 8:29 PM Phoenix time (3:29 UTC 21 September).

19 September 2010

  • Throughout the month of September 2010, NASA is undertaking a series of EVA egress/ingress tests on a full-scale mockup of the Orion crew module in the large Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) at the Johnson Space Center.

18 September 2010

17 September 2010

  • A new map of lunar craters by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter is stoking a long-smoldering debate about whether there are two sets of lunar craters: the first from the late heavy bombardment (3.9 billion years ago) – caused by objects that were pushed out of the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter, and the second from more recent craters due to a population of near-Earth asteroids.

16 September 2010

  • The Boeing Company [NYSE: BA] and Space Adventures, Ltd. have established a memorandum of agreement regarding the marketing of anticipated transportation services to destinations in low Earth orbit (LEO) on Boeing commercial crew spacecraft.
  • NASA has announced the awards for the NASA Launch Services (NLS) II Contract. The award will provide a broad range of launch services for NASA’s planetary, Earth-observing, exploration and scientific satellites. NASA selected four companies for awards: Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company of Denver; Orbital Sciences Corporation of Dulles, Va.; Space Exploration Technologies of Hawthorne, Calif.; and United Launch Services, LLC of Littleton, Colo.
  • Eye Candy: The Carina Nebula
  • Impact craters on the surface of the moon tell the tale of a troubled, violent childhood that may have continued into the moon’s adolescence — a history shared, but obliterated, on Earth.

15 September 2010

  • Space Junk is a real threat to human exploration. If it gets bad enough, we would no longer have access to space.
  • Russia has shipped four RD-180 rocket engines to the United States for use on Atlas launch vehicles.

14 September 2010

  • (PhysOrg.com) — Researchers have modeled the likely path taken by Halley’s comet in the 5th century BC and compared their findings to ancient Greek texts from the period. They now suggest the ancient Greeks saw the comet, which would make the sightings over two centuries earlier than previous known observations.

13 September 2010

  • In a paper in the 10 September issue of Science, Paul Niles at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston discusses the implications of carbon and oxygen isotope ratios obtained by the Phoenix Lander for liquid water on the Martian surface in both the past and modern times, along with geologically recent signs of volcanic activity.
  • Two years after saying that the DIRECT project’s Jupiter 130 rocket “defied the laws of physics”, NASA engineers are putting the finishing touches on their nearly identical design: four space shuttle engines underneath the external fuel tank, two four segment solid rocket motors just like the shuttle stack, and the crew and cargo on top. The design made sense in 1992, 2004, 2008 and it still makes sense now.

12 September 2010

  • The Russian Progress M-07M / 39 spacecraft linked up to the aft docking port of the station’s Zvezda service module at 4:58 AM Phoenix time (1158 GMT) above Mongolia.
  • The Spaceport’s Ariane 5 Final Assembly Building has welcomed its fourth heavy-lift launcher of 2010 as preparations move ahead for Arianespace’s dual-satellite mission with the Eutelsat W3B and B-SAT Corporation BSAT-3b payloads on October 28 from French Guiana.

11 September 2010

  • Japan’s H-IIA F18 with the first quasi-zenith satellite “Michibiki” on-board was launched on 11 September at 11:17 UTC (8:17 PM – Japan Standard Time) from the Tanegashima Space Center.
  • ESA has released a Hubble image of a weird, spiral pre-planetary nebula. It is being created by an extreme carbon star, one fortified with so much carbon that there’s a sooty deposit in its photosphere thick enough to block the visible light trying escape from underneath. The star is beginning its death throes, and is shedding its outer layers.

10 September 2010

  • The Russian Progress M-07M was successfully launched on a re-supply mission to the International Space Station, this morning, Friday, 10 September 2010 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 14:22 Moscow time (10:22 UTC – 3:22 Phoenix Time).

9 September 2010

  • A Russian Soyuz-U launch vehicle was scheduled to launch the M-07M/39P Progress resupply ship into orbit on Wednesday morning, but the launch was scrubbed due to high winds. The next attempt will be made Friday.
  • Meanwhile, a Russian Rockot three stage launcher carried a Gonets-M satellite and two Kosmos satellites into orbit. The launch took place at 03:30 UTC on Wednesday.
  • Big Bang Detector heads to space: the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer will study the universe and its origins by searching for dark matter and antimatter and measuring the composition of cosmic rays with greater precision than any previous device.

8 September 2010

  • NASA’s Deep Impact spacecraft beamed down the first image of comet Hartley 2. The image was obtained by the spacecraft’s Medium Resolution Imager on Sept. 5 when the spacecraft was 60 million kilometers (37.2 million miles) away from the comet.
  • Huntsville Alabama is fielding a team to compete for the Lunar X Prize. The goal is to land a rover on the moon, have it travel 500 feet and send pictures and data back to Earth before Dec. 31, 2012. Dynetics Corp. executives announced Tuesday they will lead a seven-organization team.

7 September 2010

  • The Space Review discusses Commercial Crew.
  • VASIMR: hope or hype for Mars exploration?
  • Two small asteroids will pass the Earth this week, within the distance of the Moon. The two objects were discovered on 5 September by Andrea Boattini working with the 1.5 metre reflector at Mount Lemmon in Arizona as part of the Mount Lemmon Survey.

6 September 2010

  • NASA has announced the five experiments that SolarProbePlus will carry when launched in 2018. “The experiments selected for Solar Probe Plus are specifically designed to solve two key questions of solar physics — why is the sun’s outer atmosphere so much hotter than the sun’s visible surface and what propels the solar wind that affects Earth and our solar system? ” said Dick Fisher, director of NASA’s Heliophysics Division in Washington.
  • Recent news about inflatable space habitats, and some history.

5 September 2010

  • Read Lori Garver’s address to the AIAA convention: Space: The Next 50 Years.
  • China launched its eighth satellite of the year and its fourth launch in five weeks. A Long March 3B rocket carrying the Chinasat 6A satellite lifted off from the Xichang space center in southwestern China’s Sichuan province at 1614 GMT (12:14 p.m. EDT) Saturday.

4 September 2010

  • The New Scientist describes the Danish rocket: the smallest crewed spacecraft ever launched, standing room only.
  • The ATHLETE rover, currently under development at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is in the Arizona desert this month to participate in NASA’s Research and Technology Studies, also known as Desert RATS.

3 September 2010

  • The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) announced today that astronaut Chris Hadfield will return to space for a third time and become the first Canadian Commander of the International Space Station (ISS). Hadfield will launch aboard a Russian Soyuz rocket in December 2012, and take command of the station during the second half of a six-month mission.
  • Astrobiology Magazine has a discussion of past, present and future solar sail devices.
  • Tethers on spacecraft may allow maneuvering without fuel.

2 September 2010

  • Russia’s Proton-M rocket blasted off from its Baikonur launching pad at 0:53 GMT Thursday and placed three GLONASS satellites in orbit. Two will join the existing system and the third will be used as an on-orbit backup.

1 September 2010

  • The Herschel infrared space observatory has discovered that ultraviolet starlight is the key ingredient for making water in space.
  • A group of 30 Nobel Laureates, former NASA officials and astronauts and space policy experts have stepped up pressure on U.S. House lawmakers to support key elements of the Obama administration’s space policy. An eight-page letter delivered Tuesday to House Science Committee chairman Bart Gordon and other leaders says the House’s NASA plans “substantially” underfund technology development, commercial spaceflight, student research and robotic exploration precursors, among other priorities.

Posted in Asteroid, Canadian Space Agency, Comet, Earth, European Space Agency, International Space Station, JAXA, Mars, NASA, Russian Space Agency, Space Shuttle | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

November 2009

Posted by drdave on August 4, 2010

30 November 2009

29 November 2009

  • “MOSCOW, November 30 (RIA Novosti) – A launch of a Zenit carrier rocket with a U.S. telecommunications satellite originally scheduled for Sunday midnight has been delayed for technical reasons, a spokesman for Russia’s space agency Roscosmos said”. From RIA Novosti.
  • From our neighbor down south, the Arizona Daily Star in Tucson has another report on Jupiter’s moon Europa, and the likelihood of finding life thereupon.

28 November 2009

  • Butterflies in Orbit. The butterfly habitat will be transferred to the Space Station within the first 2-3 days of the STS – 129 mission. “About 100 elementary and middle school classrooms across the U.S. are participating in a pilot study by setting up ground-based habitats. Students will replicate the space experiment and compare the growth and behavior of their butterfly larvae with those living in the microgravity environment of space,” said Dr. Greg Vogt, senior project manager at Baylor College of Medicine’s (BCM) Center for Educational Outreach.
  • The European Space Agency (ESA) has released beautiful spectra from the Herschel spacecraft situated at SEL-2. Detailed analyses of these spectra provide insight into the physical and chemical composition of the objects. For example, see the results of the SPIRE spectrum of Canis Majoris. Herschel covers the full far infrared and submillimetre waveband.

27 November 2009

26 November 2009

  • HiRISE image of Gullies and Flow Features on a crater wall on Mars
  • An update on the “Hole-in-the-Moon” discovered by the Japanese spacecraft Kaguya and the associated lava tube. A ready to use Moon Base?

25 November 2009

  • Dark Matter may power your journey to the stars.
  • The Space Shuttle Atlantis has undocked from the International Space Station and is scheduled to return to Earth on Friday, 27 November 2009.

24 November 2009

  • A long, but fascinating, article about how we may have acquired many of the stars in our Zodiac in a giant, violent event 30 Million years ago.
  • A beautiful image of the Crab Nebula, which exploded in 1054 AD. This is a composite image from the Chandra X-Ray orbital telescope, the Hubble telescope in visible light and the Spitzer Space Telescope in the infrared.
  • Operation Plymouth Rock.

23 November 2009

  • 40 minutes from now (10:50 PM Phoenix time) you can get the latest updates on the Atlas 5 launch of the Intelsat 14 at the Forum at NASASpaceFlight.com. If you miss the live launch, get the details at the Intelsat 14 link.
  • The New Scientist reports that a dark matter galaxy may be crashing through the Milky Way.

22 November 2009

21 November 2009

  • Cassini makes its eighth flyby of Enceladus where the Composite Infrared Spectrograph (CIRS) instrument will make a map of thermal emissions from the tiger stripe at Baghdad Sulcus.
  • The Astronaut Hall of Fame in Titusville, Florida was the sight of NASA’s Astronaut Glove Centennial Challenge contest yesterday. Peter Homer of Southwest Harbor, Maine, won $250,000 for his glove, and Ted Southern of Brooklyn, New York won $100,000. Congratulations.
  • Gabrielle Giffords of Arizona and Pete Olson of Texas have dug in their heels and reiterated their backing of the doomed Constellation program. Even though Ares I is underpowered and technically challenged and Ares V is over weight and too costly to fly, both want to throw more money at it and hope for the best: “The United States needs to make clear to the rest of the world that we are not wavering” said Giffords. But costs will ultimately undo Constellation. Ares I has cost $8 Billion so far, and will ultimately cost four (4) times what human rating of commercial vehicles will cost, yielding a rocket with less capability than commercial vehicles. Apparently, the politicians are all-in to protect their constituents jobs and funding, but will likely lose the bet.

20 November 2009

19 November 2009

  • The first spacewalk of the mission began at 7:24 AM Phoenix time and will work on a number of maintenance tasks outside the International Space Station. Mike Foreman and Robert Satcher will install a spare communications antenna, route cables, and lubricate parts of the mobile base system and Kibo robotic arm.
  • NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, is scheduled to roll to the pad on Friday, Nov. 20, its last stop before launching into space to survey the entire sky in infrared light, sometime on or after 9 December 2009.
  • The Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 that spent 15 years taking amazing pictures on board the Hubble has been returned to Earth and will take up residence in the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in Washington.

18 November 2009

17 November 2009

  • Good Leonid shower this morning, even in Phoenix (4:30 AM). In 15 minutes we saw 10 streaks, including one blue-green and a very bright white trail that left glowing debris for 5-10 seconds. But nothing compared to this one. As pretty as meteor showers are from Earth, they can be deadly for satellites.
  • Ouch! Time magazine has named the Ares I “The Invention of the Year”. Unfortunately for Time, there was no Ares I rocket launch this year. There was a space shuttle solid rocket booster with a lot of dummy components on top painted to look like an Ares I that was shot off last 28 October. Buzz Aldrin wrote a scathing review recently concerning the Ares program, labeling the $450 million launch a political stunt.

16 November 2009

15 November 2009

  • The Leonid meteor shower is set to peak Tuesday night. A well placed observer in Asia or Eastern Europe should see hundreds of meteors per hour. North Americans should see the shower just before dawn on Tuesday.
  • Fall colors in the Eastern United States, as seen from the Terra (EOS AM) and Aqua (EOS PM) satellites using the MODIS (or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument. Terra’s orbit around the Earth is timed so that it passes from north to south across the equator in the morning, while Aqua passes south to north over the equator in the afternoon.

14 November 2009

  • The Mars rover Spirit is stuck in a sand trap and may be doomed to remain there. The New Scientist has a review of the plucky life of Spirit.
  • The launch of the Atlas V carrying the Intelsat 14 communications satellite was scrubbed after a technical issue with its ORCA (Ordnance Remote Control Assembly).

13 November 2009

  • “We are ecstatic,” said Anthony Colaprete, LCROSS project scientist and principal investigator at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif. “Multiple lines of evidence show water was present in both the high angle vapor plume and the ejecta curtain created by the LCROSS Centaur impact. The concentration and distribution of water and other substances requires further analysis, but it is safe to say Cabeus holds water.”
  • Rosetta completed its third and last fly-by and is headed toward the outer Solar System and its rendezvous with comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

12 November 2009

11 November 2009

  • Armistice Day (for those of us who remember it). Veterans Day for all of us. A salute to all those who serve.
  • The Planetary Society has announced a series of three LightSail missions: “Our solar sail is back! The Planetary Society is building a spacecraft that will sail on sunlight alone by the end of 2010. “
  • Is Einstein’s theory of relativity wrong? Two spacecraft (Galileo and Rosetta) gained more speed on their past fly-bys of Earth than predicted. The next Rosetta fly-by on 13 November 2009 will be another test. A 1.1 millimeter per second of excess velocity has been predicted.

10 November 2009

  • A Soyuz rocket with the Poisk module for the International Space Station was successfully launched this morning. Docking is scheduled for Thursday at 10:44 EST.
  • Two missions are shaping up to explore the moons of Jupiter. See the discussion in this article in The New Scientist.

9 November 2009

  • A Soyuz rocket with the Poisk module for the International Space Station was erected Sunday for launch tomorrow at 9:22 EST (7:22 Phoenix). Docking is scheduled for Thursday at 10:44 EST.
  • Emily Lakdawalla of The Planetary Society will conduct two live classes in Space Image Processing: I. Images Are Data, tentatively scheduled for Friday, November 13, 2009 at 10:30 Pacific (18:30 UTC) and II. Getting Started with Space Image Data: Rover and Cassini Raw Images, tentatively scheduled for Thursday, November 19, 2009 at 10:30 Pacific (18:30 UTC). Reservations are limited, but the classes will be recorded and available for download.

8 November 2009

7 November 2009

6 November 2009

  • Wayne Hale comments on those who know “the price of everything and the value of nothing”.
  • Atlantis’ cargo, consisting of Express Logistics Carrier 1 and 2, holding about 28,000 pounds of supplies and spare parts for the International Space Station, are being loaded into the cargo bay, prior to the 16 November launch. These are critical parts.
  • Fast romp up the Space Elevator.

5 November 2009

  • Who says commercial launch vehicles are not human rated? NRO thinks several $Billion (with a $B) worth of satellites are safe with commercial ULA vehicles.
  • Gotta love a B-52 launching the X-38 lifting body. Check the mission decorations on the fuselage of the B-52.
  • The Mars Phoenix Lander has been imaged by HiRise in two images following the return of the Sun to the northern polar region of Mars – “July 30, 2009, (left image) and in Aug. 22, 2009 (right)”.

4 November 2009

  • While the concern is not new, the level of concern keeps rising – “A burgeoning blizzard of space debris is going to have a major impact on the future economics of space flight.”
  • Iron and Titanium on Mercury – the BBC reports on some of the results from the recent fly-by of Mercury by MESSENGER.
  • Astronomers have tracked down a gigantic, previously unknown assembly of galaxies. The filament is located about 6.7 billion light-years away from us and extends over at least 60 million light-years.

3 November 2009

  • You Tube has an aerial view of the Ares I-X flight.
  • The John Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory will conduct a conference today at 1 PM EDT on the recent MESSENGER flyby of Mercury. The press kit is available here.
  • Dark Matter Stars in the earliest universe? Super Black Holes?

2 November 2009

  • NASA’s Cassini spacecraft made its deepest plunge yet into the plumes of Saturn’s moon Enceladus on Monday. The dive might reveal complex organic molecules that could hint at life.
  • We Have A Winnah!! Masten Space Systems has officially won the Lunar Lander Challenge.
  • The National Space Society “Ad Astra” program helped engineer Jorge Rivera prevail with the “Beanie Cap,” which prevents ice from forming on the Space Shuttle External Tank LOX vent, avoiding harm during launch. The tool came about because of his enthusiasm.

2 November 2009

  • The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity, or SMOS, satellite was successfully launched early today aboard a Rockot launcher. The Rockot, made of retired ballistic missile parts, took off from Complex 133 at the Plesetsk Cosmodrome about 500 miles north of Moscow.
  • “Does the Final Frontier Have a Future? Debating America’s Next Steps in Human Space Flight,” will be the topic being hosted today by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). The discussion is free and open to the public, and takes place on Monday, November 2, at 1:00 p.m. in Room 106, Dirksen Senate Office Building, Constitution Ave. and 1st St. NE, Washington, D.C. Details.
  • The JAXA HTV-1 has de-orbited and burned up in the atmosphere after a successful 52 day stay.

1 November 2009

  • The Japanese Cargo Supply spacecraft HTV-1 undocked from the International Space Station and is scheduled to de-orbit and burn up in the atmosphere tomorrow with a load of trash.
  • The Soyuz TMA-17 was delivered by rail to Baikonur Cosmodrome for prelaunch processing. TMA-17 will launch the Expedition ISS-22/23 crew to the International Space Station. A large collection of photographs are at the link.
  • Interesting video from SOHO showing a class-C solar flare from sunspot 1029. From SpaceWeather.Com: “Last week alone, the sunspot produced ten C-class solar flares, more than tripling the number of flares in the previous 10 months. Sunspot 1029 is a member of long-overdue Solar Cycle 24.”

Posted in Asteroid, Comet, European Space Agency, International Space Station, Jupiter, Mars, Mercury, Moon, NASA, National Space Society, Russian Space Agency, Saturn, Space Shuttle | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »