NSS Phoenix Space News

Posts Tagged ‘Wayne Hale’

August 2010

Posted by drdave on August 6, 2010

31 August 2010

  • NASA fired the five-segment DM-2 solid rocket motor that was scheduled to be the first stage of the ill-fated Ares I rocket.

30 August 2010

  • The liquid apogee engine (LAE) of the US Air Force Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) satellite failed prematurely. The $2 billion spacecraft will now have to rely on several thruster systems to try and reach its planned geosynchronous orbit.

29 August 2010

28 August 2010

27 August 2010

  • A team of scientists at the University of Arizona will build a color stereo camera for the 2016 Europeans Space Agency Mars orbiter mission (ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter). The purpose is to study the source topography and geology of regions where gases are being released that may be related to life.
  • The European Space Agency (ESA) has released new images of Orcus Patera, an enigmatic elliptical depression near Mars’s equator. Orcus Patera is located between the volcanoes of Elysium Mons and Olympus Monsi, in the eastern hemisphere of the planet. There are several possibilities for its formation, but a low angle (5 degrees) impact by a large body is most likely.

26 August 2010

  • NASA’s Kepler spacecraft has discovered the first confirmed planetary system with more than one planet crossing in front of, or transiting, the same star.
  • JPL has released a striking image of the Martian atmosphere. The Mars Climate Sounder instrument on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is mapping the vertical distribution of temperatures, dust, water vapor and ice clouds in the Martian atmosphere as it flies a near-polar orbit.

25 August 2010

  • Astronomers using ESO’s world-leading HARPS instrument have discovered a planetary system containing at least five planets, orbiting the Sun-like star HD 10180. The researchers also have tantalising evidence that two other planets may be present, one of which would have the lowest mass ever found. This would make the system similar to our Solar System in terms of the number of planets (seven as compared to the Solar System’s eight planets).
  • Working with federal economic stimulus funds under NASA’s Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) project, Paragon Space Development Corp. of Tucson, Ariz., passed the milestone with its Commercial Crew Transport Air Revitalization System.

24 August 2010

  • The last big science experiment to launch aboard the Space Shuttle has arrived at the Kennedy Space Center. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer will soak up cosmic rays to detect nearly indistinguishable aberrations originating in the deep universe, potentially uncovering the origin of dark matter.
  • China has launched another new satellite – the TH-1 Tian Hui-1 – on August 24, using a CZ-2D Chang Zheng-2D (Long March 2D) launch vehicle from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center.

23 August 2010

  • Japanese amateur astronomer Masayuki Tachikawa caught the possible fireball event on Jupiter in a video at 18:22 UT on 20 August. I appeared as a brief, two second, brightening near the north edge of Jupiter’s Northern Equatorial Belt.

22 August 2010

  • Discovery’s External Tank (ET-137), along with ET-138 and the yet-to-be-shipped ET-122 – currently set to fly with STS-335/135) – are to undergo X-ray inspections, following an investigation into a washer that was found inside ET-138′s LO2/LOX Feedline.

21 August 2010

  • The Mars Hoax… Drinks Are On Me! Mark Thompson at Discovery.Com discusses the 2003 NASA news release that lead to the infamous email. “Every year, as regular as clockwork, ‘that’ email does the rounds. But no, Mars won’t be as big as the moon in the sky on Aug. 27.”

20 August 2010

  • Amateur astronomy lost one its most iconic figures today. Jack Horkheimer, known to millions as public television’s ebullient “Star Gazer,” died this afternoon at age 72.
  • The Moon is Shrinking.
  • Atlantis has gained one final mission, flying STS-135 to the International Space Station (ISS), with a launch date targeting June 28, 2011.
  • Space-X successfully tested its Dragon space capsule. A helicopter released the capsule at an altitude of 14,000 feet and the craft deployed two drogue parachutes for stability. Then three orange and white main parachutes unfurled to a diameter of 116 feet each. The dummy capsule was recovered by boat and returned to shore, according to SpaceX.

19 August 2010

  • The Planetary Society has sent a letter to the Chairs and Ranking Minority Members of the four subcommittees currently considering the NASA budget and the Administration’s plan for human space exploration. The letter states: “We are concerned about omissions and a lack of coherence in the four committees’ versions of this bill.”
  • The International Space Station closed in on the full recovery of internal systems on Aug. 18, including the reactivation of power to science experiments, following a serious malfunction of the external cooling system on July 31.
  • The left rear landing gear on Virgin Galactic’s WhiteKnight Two failed during a test flight in the Mojave desert 19 August.

18 August 2010

17 August 2010

  • China says it has completed assembling the first module for its space station, and the country’s space agency hopes to launch it next year.

16 August 2010

  • NASA astronauts Doug Wheelock and Tracy Caldwell Dyson have installed the new Ammonia Pump on the International Space Station. Ground controllers have pronounced the pump healthy.
  • Stewart Money, at The Space Review, discusses the potential longevity of the Merlin 1c rocket engine, comparing it in its simplicity to the venerable Chevy short block.

15 August 2010

14 August 2010

  • An Atlas V has launched the first Advanced Extremely High Frequency satellite from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral at 11:07 UTC Today. It will provide communications for the armed forces of the US and its allies.
  • NASA has packed up Robonaut 2 for a trip aboard STS-133 to the International Space Station. It consists of a head, torso and two arms with five fingered hands. Robonaut 2 is designed to use tools like humans do, and eventually perform tasks outside the ISS.

13 August 2010

  • SETIcon unfolds this weekend at the Hyatt Regency Santa Clara hotel, located at 5101 Great America Parkway, Santa Clara, CA
  • National Research Council released its decadal survey for astronomy, which includes independent appraisals of the technical readiness of missions, their cost and a development schedule. The committee also suggested that an independent panel be appointed to reappraise priorities in astrophysics more frequently.

12 August 2010

  • Astronomers have found a new 100km diameter Trojan asteroid near Neptune. It is one of only six Trojan asteroids associated with Neptune, compare to several hundred thousand associated with Jupiter.

11 August 2010

  • ISS crewmembers Tracy Caldwell-Dyson and Doug Wheelock performed the second of now three planned EVAs to bring the Station’s cooling system back to full operating capacity following the failure of the Loop A ammonia Pump Module on July 31. The EVA was a big success. The failed pump has been removed and stored. The third EVA will install the new pump.
  • Jupiter may have swallowed a massive “super-Earth” early in its formation according to new simulations.

10 August 2010

  • China has launched a new remote sensing satellite on Tuesday, the sixth Chinese launch this year. YaoGan Weixing-10 was launched via a CZ-4C Chang Zheng-4C (Long March) launch vehicle at 06:49 local time on August 10 from the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center.

9 August 2010

  • Sometime in the past 40 years, an object smashed into the Moon, digging out a new crater. LROC released a new image showing the crater, as well as an image from 1971 that was taken aboard Apollo 15, which does not show the crater.

8 August 2010

7 August 2010

  • NASA’s Doug Wheelock and Tracy Caldwell Dyson have completed their eventful opening EVA to change out a failed ammonia coolant Pump Module (PM) on the International Space Station’s (ISS) External Thermal Control System (ETCS) “Loop A”. Lasting eight hours and three minutes, the spacewalk will be followed by a second EVA next Wednesday.
  • A six-legged, 15-foot-tall robot that could one day visit Mars or the Moon spent Friday morning in a much less exotic location: the Hahamongna Watershed Park.

6 August 2010

  • The U.S. Senate passed a NASA authorization bill Aug. 5 that would add a space shuttle flight to the manifest next year and require the space agency to get started immediately on a heavy-lift rocket capable of supporting manned missions beyond low Earth orbit. The bill also authorizes funding for NASA’s proposed commercial crew initiative, but at a level below the agency’s request.
  • Aerojet’s successful Main Engine Injector Tests Provide Milestone for NASA’s Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle.

5 August 2010

  • Following a scrub-prone launch campaign in June, Arianespace have enjoyed first-time success with Wednesday’s launch of their Ariane 5 ECA vehicle – her third mission of the year. The workhorse has two telecommunication passengers – Nilesat-201 and RASCOM-QAF1R – and launched slightly after the start of the long launch window.
  • NASA and the European Space Agency have selected five instruments for a methane-sniffing Mars orbiter scheduled for launch in 2016, the first mission of a transatlantic partnership to reconnoiter the Red Planet.
  • NASA has delayed two spacewalks to fix a major cooling system failure on the International Space Station for the second time, pushing the start of the vital repairs to no earlier than Saturday.

4 August 2010

  • The Northern Lights are making a rare appearance overhead this week, thanks to a solar “burp” that occurred Sunday and has spewed particles into Earth’s atmosphere.
  • Despite hurtling along at 300,000 kilometres per second, sunlight still takes nearly 16 hours to reach Voyager 1, the most distant object ever made by humans.
  • Astronomers have generated a 3-D view at a famed exploding star to reveal how fast the powerful Supernova 1987A ejected material when it died.

3 August 2010

  • A stereo camera operated by the University of Arizona will be carried aboard a Mars orbiter in 2016 as part of a joint program by NASA and the European Space Agency to explore the Red Planet, the UA announced today.

2 August 2010

  • An interview with Wayne Hale, who is always enlightening.

1 August 2010

  • The International Space Station suffered a cooling system malfunction late Saturday that forced its astronaut crew to power down some vital systems while engineers on Earth study the problem.
  • China successfully launched its fifth orbiter into space at 5:30 a.m. Sunday, as a part of its indigenous satellite navigation and positioning network.
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September 2009

Posted by drdave on August 4, 2010

30 September 2009

  • The Russian Soyuz reached orbit 20 minutes after a flawless launch.
  • Trouble in River City? The New Scientist discusses declining solar activity and the increase in cosmic radiation reaching the solar system and the Earth. Consult this image of the Heliosphere
  • Check out details of MESSENGER’s third flyby of Mercury (yesterday at 2:55 PM Phoenix time) on its way into orbit in 2011.
  • The latest Mars Rover mission updates. Opportunity has put 17,717 meters on its odometer (11.01 miles).

29 September 2009

  • Russia is set to launch the Soyuz rocket with Expedition 21 tomorrow, 30 September 2009. Watch live coverage with the launch at 07:14:45 UTC (14 minutes past midnight Phoenix time, Wednesday morning).
  • The Japanese HTV supply ship has delivered two experiments from the U.S. Naval Research Lab to the International Space Station.
  • The LCROSS lunar impact target has been changed. NASA changed the target to due to new hydrogen measurements from LRO.

28 September 2009

  • Stephen Hawking called for a massive investment in establishing colonies on the Moon and Mars in a lecture in honour of NASA’s 50th anniversary. He argued that the world should devote about 10 times as much as NASA’s current budget – or 0.25% of the world’s financial resources – to space.
  • The Ares I processing continues toward a 27 October 2009 launch. Descriptions of progress and problems can be seen here.
  • For a very detailed view of the lunar surface from the LRO mission, check out this image.

27 September 2009

  • Testing the Robotic Luna Lander at the Marshall Space Flight Center.
  • Now that there is evidence for water on the Moon, how do you harvest it? David Shiga at The New Scientist discusses methods.
  • An article in the Orlando Sentinal discusses a new GAO (Government Accounting Office) report that the Constellation Program is poorly managed, suffering from unsolved technical problems, and over budget with no way to estimate total costs.

26 September 2009

25 September 2009

24 September 2009

  • The New Scientist has a photo gallery of six of the world’s 150 known impact craters, starting with Manicougan Crater in Canada. It is about 200 million years old and one the Earth’s oldest known impact craters.
  • On the Moon… water, water, everywhere, according to three articles in today’s Science Express. NASA holds a press conference at 2 PM EDT. (See NSSPhoenix)
  • David P. Page, Matthew R. Balme and Monica M. Grady have an article on “Dating martian climate change“, published online in Icarus.

23 September 2009

  • Fifty years ago this week, Nature published a paper by G. Cocconi and P. Morrison outlining the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) by radio telescope.
  • Senior NASA managers have decided on a 27 October 2009 launch date for ARES 1-X
  • Wayne Hale takes up the issue and reality of commercialization of crew launch to LEO. And juxtaposes it to the air mail experiences in the 1920’s and 1930’s.

22 September 2009

  • Russia has postponed its Mars sample return mission until 2011. Planetary Society writer Emily Lakdawalla confirmed that Russia’s space agency, Roscosmos, has said that integration testing will not be completed in time to meet the October 2009 launch window. Bruce Betts writes about The The Planetary Society’s LIFE experiment, which is scheduled to fly on that mission.
  • Space Shuttle Discovery has returned to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Discovery is scheduled to launch again on 18 March 2010 as STS-131 to resupply the ISS.
  • A NASA news conference scheduled for Thursday concerns a report in this week’s issue of Science magazine that there is a lot of water on the Moon. The results are from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) aboard Chandrayaan-1.

21 September 2009

  • Curious where the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter is at the moment you are reading this? Here’s the map.
  • The conference on Asteroid-Comet Hazard – 2009 is in St Petersburg, Russia this week (21-25 September).
  • Build a model of the Hubble Space Telescope

20 September 2009

19 September 2009

  • Comments about the Japanese HTV arrival at ISS: “It’s a real example of international cooperation with a Japanese vehicle captured by a Canadian arm with American and European astronauts and a safety guy from Canada and under the command of a Russian commander,” said Frank De Winne, a European astronaut serving as flight engineer.
  • The Commercial Spaceflight Federation is pleased to announce its co-sponsorship of the Next-Generation Suborbital Researchers Conference (NSRC), which is being organized in conjunction with the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and the Universities Space Research Association (USRA).
  • The latest LROC image release.

18 September 2009

  • The Russian Soyuz-2-1B successfully put the Meteor weather satellite and other instruments into their proper orbits.
  • On the International Partner (IP) front, the Japanese HTV arrived at the ISS Thursday. The HTV is capable of delivering six tons of pressurized and unpressurized cargo.
  • From the Times of London (and many other sources) we have news from the European Planck Observatory about “radiation from just 300,000 years after the big bang and could give the clearest picture yet of what the Universe looked like just after its formation”.

17 September 2009

16 September 2009

15 September 2009

  • Testimony before the House Committee on Science and Technology
  • The launch of a Soyuz 2-1B rocket has been postponed until tomorrow due to bad weather.
  • JPL is continuing efforts to free the Spirit rover from the deep soft soil at the sie on Mars called “Troy”.
  • Discovery is safely at the Dryden processing facility at Edwards Air Force Base awaiting transportation to Florida. Welcome home.

14 September 2009

  • The comet called 147P/Kushida-Muramatsu was temporarily captured by Jupiter between 1949 and 1961. The report was made at the European Planetary Science Congress in Potsdam, near Berlin
  • Mr. Norman Augustine, Chair, Review of U.S. Human Space Flight Plans Committee, Vice Admiral Joe Dyer USN (Ret.), Chair, Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel, NASA, and Dr. Michael Griffin, former NASA Director, are scheduled to testify tomorrow before the Committee on Science and Technology concerning the report of the “Review of U.S. Human Space Flight Plans” Committee.

13 September 2009

  • The LCROSS Observation Campaign has a group on Google Groups. Follow along with the amateur astronomers working in conjunction with NASA.
  • Watch the successful flight of the Armidillo Aerospace Lunar Lander Prototype on Parabolic Arc.

12 September 2009

  • Doom and Gloom headlines from observers of the Augustine Commission Summary Report. DrDave disagrees. Watch for News.
  • Discovery returned successfully last night.
  • Armadillo Aerospace made two flights of its lunar lander prototype today, putting it in the lead position to capture the Northrop Grumman Lunar Lander Challenge.

11 September 2009

  • Discovery will try again today after weather in Florida scrubbed the landing. The landing will likely be at Edwards Air Force Base in California

10 September 2009

  • The ISS and Discovery should be visible tonight: Thursday Sept 08 @ 07:02 PM, for about 60 seconds from 20 degrees above N, end 10 degrees above NNE (Spaceflight.Nasa.Gov)
  • NASA has released a large collection of new photographs from Hubble. Check out the Butterfly Nebula and other images.
  • Discovery is scheduled to land in Florida at 4:05 PM Phoenix time.

9 September 2009

8 September 2009

  • The Augustine Commission’s Summary report has been delivered to NASA and the Whitehouse today.
  • STS-128 saw the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) returned to Discovery’s payload bay and the hatch closure between the ISS and the orbiter. Discovery will undock today.
  • The ISS and Discovery should be visible tonight: Tue Sep 08 @ 07:47 PM, start 25 above NW, end 11 above NNE (Spaceflight.Nasa.Gov)

7 September 2009

  • The Times of India reports that the lunar orbiter Chandrayaan was killed by heatstroke.
  • Florida middle and high school students have been invited to a competition to design scientific experiments to send to the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) in Utah. The contest is sponsored by Space Florida, The Mars Society, NASA-Kennedy Space Center and the Florida Department of Education (DoE).
  • The Space Shuttle Discovery will complete packing up in preparation for undocking today prior to its return to Earth.

6 September 2009

5 September 2009

  • The third and final spacewalk of the STS-128 mission is scheduled to begin at 1:49 p.m. PDT today, Saturday.
  • The indonesian telcom satellite Palapa-D, stranded short of its intended Geosynchronous orbit 36,000 km above the Earth by a third stage anomaly of the Chinese Long March 3B rocket, will be salvaged. It should be in position by mid-September and be able to serve 8-10 years of its intended 15 year life.
  • The LCROSS team has rescinded their spacecraft emergency declaration regarding propellant loss, according to a NASA memo from Daniel Andrews, Project Manager, LCROSS.

4 September 2009

3 September 2009

  • The Augustine Commission announced that “09.03.2009 – A Summary Report is in final preparations for transmittal to the Office of Science and Technology Policy and NASA on Tuesday, September 8, 2009.”
  • SpaceX signs contract to launch 18 Orbcomm communication satellites.
  • STS-128 Discovery Space Walk and ammonia tank replacement

2 September 2009

  • Astronauts remove the ISS ammonia tank prior to installation of new treadmill (C.O.L.B.E.R.T) unit on Thursday

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